Dance Conservatory is the official school of the Ballet Theatre of Dover

Since Dance Conservatory opened its doors in 1985, students have always performed repertory pieces during the school’s Workshop Performances. By the 1990s, the repertory pieces had so increased that it became necessary to schedule separate performances. Thus was born the Ballet Theatre of Dover.

Officially organized in 1995 as an entity separate from Dance Conservatory, BTD often features graduates of the school in performance with current students and guest artists.

The company’s annual performance of The Nutcracker (December) features students of Dance Conservatory from Intermediate Level through Pre-Professional Program. Seasonal performances in May and August have included classical ballet and contemporary productions such as Sleeping Beauty, Speedway (based on NASCAR racing), Swing Suite, Tommy (a rock-ballet), Carmen (a full-length ballet based on the Bizet opera), and Beatles Suite. Dancers for these productions are selected from the school.

Graduates who have danced with us are currently with companies such as the Dutch National Ballet, North Carolina Dance Theatre, the Pennsylvania Ballet, and several Broadway touring companies.

Guest artists include Petter Jacobsson of London’s Royal Ballet, Pavel Kambalov of The Russian Ballet Theatre of Delaware, Charles Askegard of the New York City Ballet, and Gennadi Savaliev of American Ballet Theatre.

Students of Dance Conservatory are encouraged to attend Ballet Theatre of Dover performances to develop an awareness of and appreciation for the different styles of dance.

CLASSICS & MORE 2016

In–Studio Theatre

Join us for the Ballet Theatre of Dover’s annual CLASSICS & MORE performance on Sat, May 21, at 7 pm and Sun, May 22 at 2 pm at the In–Studio Theatre.

The vibrant buoyancy, precise footwork and floating breadth of movement are hallmark characteristics of the famed Danish choreographer Auguste Bournonville’s choreography. Featured dances are from the ballet “Napoli” and the “Flower Festival at Genzano”. The former is set in the sunny shores of Naples, Italy, during a festival celebration accompanying a wedding. George Balanchine, founder of New York City Ballet, incorporated Bournonville’s style and technique into many of his ballets. The ballet ends with a vibrant Tarantella, a dance made famous for the effects of a bite by the dreaded tarantula spider–”dance till you drop”. Several dances in the ballet are performed as trios, sextets and solos. The simple yet intricate rhythms coupled with a bouncy and airy technique has challenged the young dancers of the company.

“La Petite Danseuse”, pays tribute to an 1881 sculpture by Edgar Degas of a young student of the Paris Opera dance school, a Belgian named Marie van Goetham. The sculpture is two-thirds life size and was originally sculpted in wax. It is dressed in a real bodice, tutu and ballet slippers and has a wig of real hair. All but a hair ribbon and the tutu are covered in wax. When it was first displayed in Paris, the public considered it ugly, the girl represented as a monkey or an Aztec. It was quickly removed from the exhibit and was not seen until the 1930’s. The ballet to music by Fredric Chopin explores the relationship of an artist to his model. Young dancers, Naya Gonzalez, age 14, and Tyler Wright, age 13, will dance the roles of Marie and Degas.

“Fitzpleasure” features the music of the British alternative British indie pop quartet alt–J from their debut studio album An Awesome Wave. The suite of contemporary dances highlights relationships and different characters as reflected by the songs.

Ballet Theatre of Dover is the performing company of the Dance Conservatory.

Tickets for the show are $ 10.00 Adults, $ 6.00/Seniors and Students..

Tickets are available at the door and at Dance Conservatory at 302–734–9717.
Visit us at facebook.com/dancebtd

Summer Performance

“Dances from ‘Le Corsaire’”
“La Petite Danseuse”
“Where The Wild Things Are”

Highlight of the performance is the premiere of a new ballet based on the children’s book ”Where the Wild Things Are” written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. This is part of the Memorial Exhibition Tour of Maurice Sendak–50 Years, 50 Works, being presented by the Dover Public Library, the Biggs Museum of Art and the Schwartz Center for the Arts. The story is about Max, a young boy of about 10 who gets into all sorts of trouble one evening to the point that his Mom sends him up to bed without his supper. That evening his room turns into a forest and he finds himself in a boat that travels through many oceans to an island inhabited by wild beasts who crown him king. He then leads the beasts of different types–Bull and Boar–based beasts, Serpent based beasts, and a Birds of Prey Beasts– into a frenzied celebration, a WILD RUMPUS. At the end. Max discovers that despite all these celebrations, he longs for the comforts of his own home

The program will also include Dances from a little–known ballet “Le Corsaire” (the Pirate), loosely based on a poem by Lord Byron of the same name. The version we know today was choreographed by Marius Petipa for the Maryinsky Ballet (formerly the Kirov Ballet) in 1868. The ballet presents divertissements from the original including the famous Dance of the Odalisques (the Jewels), a famous grand pas de deux and a scene where the corps de ballet weaves patterns to a beautiful waltz.

Guest Artist, Justin Estelle, principal dancer with The Fist State Ballet Company in Wilmington will partner with local dancer, Ana Pavon (16) in the grand pas de deux. Ms. Pavon has received scholarships to attend The Joffrey School in New York.

“La Petite Danseuse”, pays tribute to an 1881 sculpture by Edgar Degas of a young student of the Paris Opera dance school, a Belgian named Marie van Goetham. The sculpture is two-thirds life size and was originally sculpted in wax. It is dressed in a real bodice, tutu and ballet slippers and has a wig of real hair. All but a hair ribbon and the tutu are covered in wax. When it was first displayed in Paris, the public considered it ugly, the girl represented as a monkey or an Aztec. It was quickly removed from the exhibit and was not seen until the 1930’s. The ballet to music by Fredric Chopin explores the relationship of an artist to his model. Naya Gonzalez, age 14, will dance the roles of Marie and guest dancer, Justin Estelle, will dance the artist, Edgar Degas. Tickets for the show are $ 18.00 for Adults, $ 15.00 Seniors and $12.00 for students.

You can purchase ticket by calling The Schwartz Center for the Arts at (302) 678–5152. Tickets are also available online at www.schwartzcenter.com. You can also purchase tickets at the box office of The Schwartz Center.

Schedule

Classics & More 2016
Saturday, May 21st7:00pm
Sunday, May 22nd2:00pm
Summer Performance
July 30th2:00pm & 7:00pm